After a long, hot summer you are probably happy to be turning off your air conditioner for the last time until next spring. Before you put your air conditioner system away for the winter, you might want to consider having it inspected by us. If it is older or has been giving you problems, you might want to have it replaced. Here are some reasons to replace your old air conditioner in the fall.

By replacing your system in the fall, you put time on your side. Time to research the type of equipment that would be best for your situation instead of just replicating whatever you had before. Since investments in new HVAC systems can be significant, this time also allows you to plan.

 

A lot has changed since your old system was installed. You will probably realize some significant improvements in comfort and reductions in energy costs, and there are many more options available today than 15 or 20 years ago. Today you can decide on systems that provide superior nighttime comfort and humidity reductions, as well as being less noisy both inside and outside of your home. Controls, communications and programmable thermostats are some other features you might consider if you have the time to research them.

 

If you have an air conditioner that doubles as a heat pump in the winter you should definitely have your system checked out in the fall. If it was not keeping up during the hottest days in the summer, it will not keep up on the coldest days of the winter and you might end up paying extra on your power bills since you will be using auxiliary resistance heaters to stay warm. Because most heat pumps come with backup heaters, you might not even know this until you get your first heating bill. If you have a conventional furnace instead of a heat pump, fall is also a good time to have that checked out by a contractor. If it is older like the AC, you might be better off having them both replaced at the same time.

 

A lot might have changed with your home since that old AC system was installed and these changes can affect both the size and type of system you now need to adequately cool and heat your home. For example, if you added insulation, added or upgraded to windows that are more efficient, knocked out some walls or added a room, you might need a different system size. If you get the wrong size system, you could have multiple problems.